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Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe ⋆ Fermenters Kitchen

Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe

Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe

Lacto-Fermented Mayonnaise

Homemade mayonnaise is creamy and delicious. You will never want to buy store-bought mayo again. By fermenting your own mayonnaise, it will have a longer shelf life and make this usually highly-perishable condiment last much longer.

This homemade mayonnaise recipe is made with raw eggs, so use the best eggs you can buy. Organic, pasture raised, all of that will help.

If you are concerned about eating raw eggs, buy pasteurized eggs. Wondering what pasteurized eggs are? Read Pasteurized Eggs: Where to Buy Them and How They Taste.

 

Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe

Category: Fermented Condiments

Servings: 3/4 cup

Homemade Mayonnaise Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp whey (from drained yogurt)
  • 1 egg plus 1 egg yolk
  • 3 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3/4 tsp dry mustard
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 Cup neutral oil such as safflower or canola

Instructions

  1. First make some whey. The easiest way to make whey is to drain some plain yogurt through a cheesecloth (make sure you choose a type of yogurt that has live active cultures in it). The whey is the liquid that is separated from the yogurt.
  2. Combine all the ingredients except the oil. Using room temperature ingredients. Then, slowly add the oil drop by drop, while whisking constantly. You must add the oil slowly to create a proper emulsion.
  3. You can eat the mayonnaise right away.
  4. Or you can ferment it to give it a longer shelf life. To ferment the mayo leave it on your counter for 8 hours, ideally at at temp between 65-72ᵒF (18-22ᵒC). Then cover and transfer to the refrigerator for long-term storage.

Notes

Equipment: Mason jar or any glass jar outfitted with an airlock.

cheesecloth or clean cloth for draining whey

whisk or food processor or immersion blender

https://fermenterskitchen.com/homemade-mayonnaise-recipe/

 

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